The Case for Going on a Group Honeymoon

When it comes to the ultimate restorative honeymoon, we typically envision a romantic getaway for two—and only two—but some couples are thinking outside the box and inviting a few family members or friends along to share in the fun. Why? It’s a unique opportunity to celebrate your union with those closest to you beyond the context of the wedding. Since more couples are marrying later in life, and as family and friends spread out to live in different states or even countries, the traditional “honeymoon period” isn’t as sacred as it once was. As long as you guarantee a healthy dose of alone time, shaking up tradition can have its perks. Go kayaking with your adorable nieces and nephews or do a multicourse cooking class with your best friends from college—and then have the next day to yourselves.

Although it may not be for everyone, a group honeymoon might make your first days as a married couple special in unexpected ways. That said, it’ll require some serious planning and thought (as a typical honeymoon would too). From lodging to location, here’s our breakdown of things to consider.

Guest List

This isn’t the occasion for distant family or high-maintenance acquaintances. Only invite loved ones you actually want to spend time with and who will respect and honor your first few days as newlyweds above everything else.

Location

If you’re already having a destination wedding, you and your partner can keep it simple by sticking around with your closest friends when the guests leave. Have family on opposite coasts? Invite them to join you for a portion of your hiking excursion in Colorado. No matter what, as the newlyweds, it’s your choice.

Budget

Be clear and honest about what you expect to pay and what you expect from others. Consider the benefits of shared costs for things like meals, excursions and lodging packages.

Planning

It’s always wise to have honeymoon activities planned (spa day, anyone?), but when it comes to a group honeymoon, balancing quality newlywed time with group excursions is crucial. Be clear about days (and nights!) that are only for you two, and don’t hesitate to put someone else in charge of planning group meals or activities.

Lodging

Most resorts offer a range of lodging opportunities, which can make it easy for you and your partner to separate from the group when the time is right. Reserve the penthouse suite or personal bungalow for just the two of you—and a cluster of rooms or cottages for your lucky companions.

Source: The Knot

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